The Best Antenna Combiner: A Comprehensive Guide To The Different Types

Best Antenna Combiner

Antenna combining is an effective way to address antenna limitations and improve the performance of wireless devices operating in the 5GHz band. It’s a technology that combines multiple antennas into a single virtual antenna with improved gain. Antenna combining reduces interference among antennas, thus enabling more simultaneous connections on a wireless device. On top of all this, it also improves transmit power by reducing the isolation between antennas and reducing leakage from them, as well as lowering the noise floor and increasing SNR. These benefits enable wireless devices to achieve better range, faster data transfer speeds, and greater capacity for network coverage. In this article, we will explore in detail what antenna combining is and its different types.

Here Are The Top 3 Products To Check At A Glance If You Are In A Hurry

Product
Linear 2512 ChannelPlus DC & IR Passing 2-Way Splitter/Combiner, SILVER
Linear 2514 Channelplus Dc & IR Passing 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Linear 2534 Channel Plus 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Linear 2512 ChannelPlus DC & IR Passing 2-Way Splitter/Combiner, SILVER
Linear 2514 Channelplus Dc & IR Passing 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Linear 2534 Channel Plus 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Product
Linear 2512 ChannelPlus DC & IR Passing 2-Way Splitter/Combiner, SILVER
Linear 2512 ChannelPlus DC & IR Passing 2-Way Splitter/Combiner, SILVER
Product
Linear 2514 Channelplus Dc & IR Passing 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Linear 2514 Channelplus Dc & IR Passing 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Product
Linear 2534 Channel Plus 4-Way Splitter/Combiner
Linear 2534 Channel Plus 4-Way Splitter/Combiner

Top 8 Best Products Reviewed

1

Linear 2512 ChannelPlus DC & IR Passing 2-Way Splitter/Combiner, SILVER. The 2512 ChannelPlus has been designed to provide a 1 GHz bandwidth. It is ideal for antenna and coax operations and passes DC IR signals on the coax. The product can be used as a signal splitter or combiner. It provides 3.5 dB insertion loss with a -2 dB max return loss, ensuring you get the best possible performance.

Features

  • 1 GHz bandwidth
  • 3.5 dB insertion loss
  • Passes DC IR signals on the coax
  • Use as a signal splitter or combiner
  • DC and I/R passing
Pros
  • DC and IR pass-through
  • Easy to use
  • Low insertion loss
  • Very good price/quality ratio Cons
Cons
  • Can’t be used for DC signal
  • No RF bypassing

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2

The Linear 2514 Channelplus Dc & IR Passing 4-Way Splitter/ Combiner is a professional grade coaxial cable signal combiner that is designed for use in commercial and industrial installations. This combiner can be used as a signal splitter or

combinator. It combines four channels of RF signals from its input port to its output ports, each with 1 GHz bandwidth and 8 dB insertion loss. In addition, it passes DC IR signals on the coax as well.

Features

  • 1 GHz bandwidth
  • 8 dB insertion loss
  • Passes DC IR signals on the coax
  • Use as a signal splitter or combiner
Pros
  • Four 1 GHz channels
  • 8 dB insertion loss
  • Passes DC IR signals on the coax
  • Easy to install and use

Cons
  • The price of this product is very high.
  • The installation of the product needs some skill, as they are not that easy to install.

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3

The Linear 2534 Channel Plus 4-Way Splitter/Combiner is perfect for antenna or coaxial operations. It has 1 GHz bandwidth, an insertion loss of 9 dB, and can be used as a signal splitter or combiner. The 4-way splitter/combiner has an impedance of 75 ohms, a power handling capability of 100 watts, and is ideally suited for use with antennas.

Features

  • 1 GHz bandwidth
  • 9 dB insertion loss
  • Use as a signal splitter or combiner
  • Ideal for antenna and coaxial operations
Pros
  • 4-way splitter/combiner
  • Power handling capability of 100 watts
  • Ideal for antenna and coaxial operations
  • 1 GHz bandwidth

Cons
  • Can be used as a signal splitter or combiner.
  • Has 1 GHz bandwidth and an insertion loss of 9 dB.

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4

The Legrand On-Q Pro Series Cable Splitter 6kV is ideal for use with MoCA-capable networks, and also supports VoIP and DOCSIS 3.0 networks. ON Q CABLE SPLITTER ON Q professional-grade digital cable splitter is perfect for use with MoCA-capable networks and also supports VoIP and DOCSIS 3.0 networks.

Features

  • Ideal for use with MoCA-capable networks
  • Supports VoIP and DOCSIS 3.0
  • 6kV surge protection on all ports
  • Dimensions: Depth: 0.60″ Length
Pros
  • The price is expensive
  • It is compact
  • Has 4 ports
  • Has a detachable power cord
Cons
  • The cable is too short
  • The weight of the device is not good enough

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5

The GE Digital 2-Way Coaxial Cable Splitter distributes a digital signal of 2.5 GHz (5-2500 Mhz) frequency range to up to two devices, for use with HD TV signals, satellite TV, and high-speed internet modems as well as cable TV, amplified antennas, amplifiers, and other coaxial devices.

Features

  • 2.5 GHz (5-2500 Mhz) frequency range
  • Splits a single digital signal to up to 2 devices
  • Gold plated connectors, allowing for optimal connectivity and corrosion resistance
Pros
  • Easy to install and use.
  • A good choice for connecting multiple digital devices.
  • Good value for money.
  • Allows for fast and easy connection of multiple digital devices.

Cons
  • It does not have a power button.
  • The on/off switch is on the side instead of the front.

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6

The best 2-way coax cable splitter on the market, this device is compatible with all TVs and other devices. It delivers high-definition 1Ghz performance and will allow you to connect your TV and antenna conveniently. The extension pole makes installation easy, even in hard-to-reach places, and the extended product life means you won’t have to worry about it breaking down on you.

Features

  • High-Performance Coax Cable Splitter
  • Two-way signal transmission 
  • 1GHz Digital Signal
  • Amplifies TV signal
Pros
  • Easy to install
  • Good quality
  • High performance
  • Longer lifespan

Cons
  • The device is bulky
  • The cable length is not sufficient

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7

Channel Vision’s model SPL-4S1 is a split/combiner that allows for easy installation with larger coaxial cables. The SPL-4S1 can be used as either a splitter or a combiner and has a frequency of 1 GHz. The female 75-ohm input/output connections allow for DC past all ports, and the unit is I/R passive.

Features

  • Allows for easy installation, especially with larger coaxial cables
  • 1GHz
  • Female 75-ohm input/output connections
  • DC passes all ports
  • I/R passive
Pros
  • Easy installation with larger coaxial cables
  • Frequency of 1 GHz
  • Female 75-ohm input/output connections
  • DC passes all ports

Cons
  • No automatic gain control
  • Requires DC to pass all ports

8

The Linear 2538 Channel Plus 8-Way Splitter/Combiner is perfect for antenna and coaxial operations. This device provides a 1 GHz bandwidth with 12 dB insertion loss and can be used as either a signal splitter or combiner. The 8-way splitter/combiner is available in a variety of colors to meet your needs.

Features

  • 1 GHz bandwidth
  • 12 dB insertion loss
  • Use as a signal splitter or combiner
  • 8-Way
Pros
  • Available in a variety of colors to meet your needs.
  • Provides a 1 GHz bandwidth with 12 dB insertion loss.
  • Can be used as either a signal splitter or combiner.
  • 1 GHz bandwidth.

Cons
  • Only available in one color.
  • Not suitable for high-power applications.

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What Is Antenna Combining?

  • Antenna combining is a technology that combines multiple antennas into a single virtual antenna with improved gain.
  • It reduces interference among antennas, thus enabling more simultaneous connections on a wireless device.
  • On top of all this, it also improves transmit power by reducing the isolation between antennas and reducing leakage from them, as well as lowering the noise floor and increasing SNR (signal to noise ratio).
  • These benefits enable wireless devices to achieve better range, faster data transfer speeds, and greater capacity for network coverage.
  • Antenna combining is used in wireless routers, access points, base stations, and other wireless devices to increase the range, speed, and capacity of their networks.

Types Of Antenna Combining

Omni-directional Antenna Combining

Omni-directional combining is the most common type of antenna combining. It combines all antennas in a single direction (vertical, horizontal, or diagonal) to form a single virtual antenna with an improved gain and reduced isolation between antennas.

Directional Antenna Combining

Directional combining is another type of antenna combining in which multiple antennas are combined into a single virtual antenna that covers a specific directional range. It’s useful when the multiple antennas are positioned in different directions, such as vertical and horizontal. The virtual antenna has the same gain as each individual antenna and is isolated from the other antennas by a null of 20 dB or less.

Multi-Element Antenna Combining

Multi-element combining uses more than one RF feeder to combine multiple antennas into one virtual antenna with an improved gain and reduced isolation between them; this improves the performance of wireless devices operating in the 5GHz band. The benefits of this type of combining, as compared to omnidirectional combining, are that the gain and isolation between antennas are increased by up to 10 dB and 4 dB respectively.

Multi-Feeder Antenna Combining

Multi-feeder combining combines multiple RF feeds into a single virtual antenna with an improved gain and reduced isolation between them. This improves the performance of wireless devices operating in the 5GHz band because it increases the gain and isolation between antennas by up to 10 dB and 3 dB respectively. Multi-feeder combining can be achieved using a single feed or multiple feeds, each consisting of a number of elements (antennas) fed by different RF paths; the number of elements in each feed determines how much-combined gain will be achieved.

Diversity Antenna Combining

Diversity antenna combining combines multiple antennas into a single virtual antenna with an improved gain and reduced isolation between them by using more than one antenna. The benefits of this type of combination, as compared to multi-element antenna combination, are that the gain and isolation between antennas are increased by up to 10 dB and 5 dB respectively. Diversity antenna combining can be achieved using a single feed or multiple feeds each consisting of a number of elements (antennas), fed by different RF paths; the number of elements in each feed determines how much combined gain will be achieved.

Beamforming Antenna Combining

Beamforming antenna combining combines multiple antennas into a single virtual antenna with an improved gain and reduced isolation between them by using beamforming techniques to steer the signals from multiple antennas, creating a narrow beam over which they are combined. This improves the performance of wireless devices operating in the 5GHz band because it increases the gain and isolation between antennas by up to 10 dB and 3 dB respectively. Beamforming can be achieved using a single feed or multiple feeds each consisting of a number of elements (antennas), fed by different RF paths; the number of elements in each feed determines how much combined gain will be achieved.

How Does Antenna Combining Work?

Single-Input Multiple-Output (SIMO)

The simplest form of antenna combining is the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) system. This is a system that combines multiple antennas into a single virtual antenna with improved gain. For example, three antennas can be combined into one to yield a virtual antenna with an effective gain of 3. This means that the same amount of power will be radiated by the virtual antenna as if it had three individual antennas instead of one.

Dual Input Multiple Output (DIMO)

The second type of antenna combining is called dual input multiple outputs (DIMO). DIMO combines two antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in their polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Tri-Input Multiple Output (TIMO)

The third type of antenna combining is called tri-input multiple outputs (TIMO). TIMO combines three antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in the polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Quad-Input Multiple Output (QIMO) and Octal Input Multiple Output (ODIM)

The fourth type of antenna combining is called quad-input multiple outputs (QIMO) and octal input multiple outputs (ODIM). These two types of antenna combining together combine four antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in the polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Radial-MIMO Antenna Combining

The fifth type of antenna combining is called radial-MIMO antenna combining. This is a form of antenna combining that combines multiple antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain by using a directional beam. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in the polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) Antenna Combining

The sixth type of antenna combining is called multi-input multi-output (MIMO) antenna combining. This is a form of antenna combining that combines multiple antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain by using multiple beams with orthogonal polarizations. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in the polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Beamforming Antenna Combining

The seventh type of antenna combining is called beamforming antenna combining. This is a form of antenna combining that combines multiple antennas into one virtual antenna with improved gain by using multiple beams with orthogonal polarizations and phase selectivity. The basic difference between SIMO and DIMO systems lies in the polarization properties. SIMO systems use orthogonal polarizations, while DIMO systems use linear polarization.

Advantages Of Antenna Combining

1. Increased range

The antenna combination increases the range of wireless devices, especially for devices with multiple antennas. The main reason for this is that antenna combining reduces the isolation between antennas, thus enabling more simultaneous connections on a wireless device.

2. Increased capacity

Antenna combining enables wireless devices to achieve greater capacity by reducing congestion through interference caused by multiple antennas in close proximity. It can also increase the data transfer speeds of wireless devices by reducing the distance between antennas and reducing interference between them as well as lowering the noise floor and increasing SNR.

3. Improved transmit power

Antenna combining enables wireless devices to achieve better transmit power without compromising gain or loss due to reduced isolation between antennas in close proximity. This is because antenna combining increases the isolation between antennas, thus increasing the overall efficiency of each individual antenna, thereby increasing its ability to carry out its intended purpose while simultaneously improving performance under high transmit power conditions. This allows wireless devices to improve their ability to communicate at a distance from an access point or from an antenna.

4. Reduced noise floor

Antenna combining enables wireless devices to improve the SNR of their signals by reducing the isolation between antennas and reducing interference from them, as well as lowering the noise floor and increasing SNR. This means that wireless devices will be able to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio at a given distance from an access point or from an antenna, which translates into improved performance in data transfer speeds and range under high transmit power conditions.

5. Improved range in urban areas

Antenna combining is especially useful in urban areas where it can reduce interference among multiple antennas, thus enabling more simultaneous connections on a wireless device while improving performance under high transmit power conditions. This is because multiple antennas used in close proximity can cause interference with one another since they are all trying to communicate at the same time. Antenna combining reduces this interference by isolating each antenna so that they do not interfere with each other and therefore can operate simultaneously without interference, thereby improving their performance and increasing the range at which wireless devices can communicate.

Conclusion

Antenna combining is an effective way to address antenna limitations and improve the performance of wireless devices operating in the 5GHz band. Combining antennas can reduce interference among antennas, thus enabling more simultaneous connections on a wireless device. On top of all this, it also improves transmit power by reducing the isolation between antennas and reducing leakage from them, as well as lowering the noise floor and increasing SNR. These benefits enable wireless devices to achieve better range, faster data transfer speeds, and greater capacity for network coverage.

Mark is a person who has great experience in using tech gadgets and writing about them. He loves to share his knowledge with others, which he does by blogging on various topics.

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